Visual Arts Policy

 

 

Introductory Statement and Rationale

 

(a)                       Introductory Statement

This plan was originally created in 2004, by the teachers in St. Mary’s National School in consultation with the Board of Management. It has been updated and reviewed annually. This is the 2018 revised policy.

 

 

(b)                      Rationale

In St. Mary’s N.S. we believe that Art is a a very important way of making and communicating meaning through imagery. It enriches the child’s experience of the world and enables the child to make connections between the imaginative life and the world and helps the child to organise and express ideas, feelings and experiences in visual tangible form. Visual Arts education provides for creative and aesthetic experiences through exploring and investigating, experimenting and inventing, designing and making ain a range of media. It promotes observation and ways of seeing and helps the child to acquire sensitivity to the visual, tactile and spatial world and to aesthetic experience.

This policy was formulated to:

 

·        review our existing plan for Visual Arts and update as required.

·         document decisions regarding Visual Arts into a coherent unit.

·         benefit the teaching and learning in St. Mary’s National School by contributing to the development of a range of intelligences in each child.

 

 

 

Vision and Aims

 

Vision

In St. Mary’s N.S. we believe that celebrating difference is very important as our school is a multicultural one. We believe that Visual Art has its own universal language which we can all understand no matter what language we speak or what country we come from. Arts Education enables the child to explore alternative ways of communicating with others and so it emphasises the creative process, rather than the finished product, and celebrates difference. In St. Mary’s N.S. the Arts Education Curriculum will encompass a range of activities in the visual arts, in music, in drama, in dance and in literature and we will always strive to provide a balance between expression and the child’s need to experience and respond.

Aims

 

We endorse the aims of the Primary School Curriculum for Visual Arts, which are:

•      To help the child develop sensitivity to the visual, spatial and tactile world, and to provide for aesthetic experience.

•      To help the child express ideas, feelings and experiences in visual and tactile forms.

•      To enable the child to have enjoyable and purposeful experiences of different art media and to have opportunities to explore, experiment, imagine, design and communicate with different art materials.

•      To promote the child’s understanding of and personal response to creative processes involved in making two and three-dimensional art.

•      To enable the child to develop the skills and techniques necessary for expression, inventiveness and individuality.

•      To enable the child to experience the excitement and fulfilment of creativity and the achievement of potential through art activities.

•      To foster sensitivity towards and enjoyment and appreciation of the visual arts.

•      To provide opportunities for the child to explore how the work of artists and craftspeople might relate to his/her own work.

 

Curriculum Planning

1. Strands and Strand Units

 

The following Strands/Strand Units will be covered in all classes:

Strands Strand Units
   
Drawing Making Drawings
  Looking and Responding
Paint and Colour Painting
  Looking and Responding
Print Making Prints
  Looking and Responding
Clay Developing form in clay
  Looking and Responding
Construction Making Constructions
  Looking and Responding
Fabric and Fibre Creating in Fabric and Fibre
  Looking and Responding

 

Teachers can choose a range of activities from each strand for their yearly plans. (See Appendix 1 for class ideas). The strand Looking and Responding can be integrated into the Art lesson or can be a stand-alone lesson. Children should be given the opportunity to look and talk about his/her work, other children’s work and artist’s work. This can be achieved through use of The Artist’s Chair(See Appendix 2). To ensure that there is continuity and progression in the Visual Arts curriculum from Junior Infants to Sixth Class, refer to Appendix 3 at the end of this document which includes a list of Artists for each class level to study.

•      The children are given the opportunities to go to local art exhibitions (eg. Rua in Tallaght; The National Art Gallery and the IMMA). By attending these exhibitions the children are given an opportunity to look and respond to other artist’s work.

•      The main reception area and the corridors are used to display children’s art work throughout the year. Teachers are encouraged to allow their pupils to experience and enjoy other pupils’ displays

•      Displaying the children’s weekly art in the classroom will give the children an opportunity to respond to their own art work and the art of their peers.

 

By discussing the children’s work and the work of other artists the teacher can informally draw attention to the visual elements of line, shape, colour and tone, texture, pattern and rhythm, form and spatial organisation. Below are some of the questions we use to help develop the children’s sensitivity to the visual elements:

Line: What kind of line do you see? Are they straight/curved? What effects are created by the lines?

Shape: What shapes do you see? Are they curved? What effects do these shapes create?

Colour and Tone: What colours do you see in the picture? Why? What effects are created?

Texture: What does the surface feel like? What materials are used?

Pattern and Rhythm: Can you see any patterns? Where are the patterns?

Form: Can you see any 2-D shapes (triangle, square etc.) 3-D shapes (cubes, balls, etc)?

Spatial Organisation: Is there a lot of space/depth in the picture.

 

2. Children with Different Needs

•      All children should enjoy equal access to Visual Art. For example, brief one session art activities may be appropriate if children have a very short attention span.

•      Children with learning difficulties may need to have certain parts of the art lesson broken down into smaller units and they may also need 1-1 support from the class teacher, SEN teacher or an SNA, to complete an activity.

•      Other children may need to be given a greater challenge to complete the same activity.

•      The visual arts programme should be differentiated to ensure that all learning styles and needs are being addressed.

 

3. Linkage and Integration

Many other curricular areas provide an opportunity for drawing, painting, colouring and using clay and construction. Activities that integrate the visual arts with other subjects can be planned in conjunction with the yearly and monthly plans. The Visual Arts Curriculum Handbook provides activities and ideas for linkage and integration at the end of each strand. Some examples include:

Junior Infants

SPHE: Myself and Others/My Friends

Art Lesson: Create “My Friends” in drawing, clay, fabric and fibre & paint and colour.

Senior Infants

Maths: Shapes

Art Lesson: Make shapes, draw shapes or paint and colour shapes.

First Class

Maths: Shapes

Art Lesson: Make 3-D Shapes. Paint and colour 3-D shapes.

4. Assessment and Record Keeping

Assessment is measured against the criteria set for the learning outcomes and is based on a number of visual art activities that have been completed over a period of time. Assessment can take various forms including:

 

•      Teacher observation – observe, question and monitor

•      Teacher designed tasks

•      Work samples, portfolios and projects

•      Pupil’s ability to select appropriate materials

•      Pupil’s organisational skills

 

Class teachers will keep a portfolio of pupils’ work which they can review at the end of each term. Class teachers will also assess objectives from two Strands of the Visual Arts curriculum, per term. They will use the template in Appendix 4 for recording pupil performance.

5. Equality of Participation and Access

 

Our aim is to ensure equal access to the Visual Arts for all our pupils including our SEN and gifted and talented pupils. Refer to “Children with Different Needs” above.

 

6. Organisational Planning

Timetable

As per the guidelines in the Primary School Curriculum, teachers will assign 1 to 1.5 hours of discrete time, per week, to the Visual Arts. Each teacher will be responsible for the timetabling and organisation of the visual arts programme in the classroom.

7.Displays

We recognise the importance of providing a bright and stimulating environment for our pupils.  Work may be displayed in the following areas:

 

•      Classroom

•      Corridor

•      Visual Arts Noticeboard in the corridor where children contribute their own Art to be displayed

•      Christmas art for Christmas concert in hall/ Artwork for International Day in Hall

•      Children’s Art portfolios

•      School Reception Area in Scrapbook

8. Resources and ICT

Each class will be given their own art resources, i.e. paint, brushes, paper etc. which will be ordered in June (for the coming school year) and January by the Visual Arts co-ordinator. Shared resources will be kept by the Visual Arts co-ordinator in a central place. These resources include prints by famous artists, paint-drying racks, Visual Arts folder, etc. See Appendix 3 for a list of shared resources in the school. The children pay for Art & Craft materials at the beginning of the school year. Children will be given the option of bringing in an old t-shirt/apron to protect their uniform for Art classes.

Refer to Appendix 4 for a list of useful websites and software.

 

Refer also to our school’s Health & Safety Policy.
10. Individual Teachers’ Planning and Reporting

The class teams will work together to create the Visual Arts long and short-term plans for their class groups. Reference will be made to the school’s visual art policy in addition to the appropriate sections of the Primary School Curriculum when creating these plans.

11. Staff Development

•      Teachers will have access to all the Visual Art school resources that are available in the central place.  They will also have access to this policy on the staffshare resources on the computer system and work on different artists which will be added to each year.

•      Notices about art competitions and exhibitions will be circulated to all teachers and these are also displayed in the staffroom.

•      Elements of the visual arts may be discussed at staff meetings and/or planning days.

•      On-going professional development in the area of visual arts will be encouraged and facilitated.

12. Parental Involvement

•      Parents will be consulted before this policy is ratified.

•      Parents will be afforded the opportunity to see displays of pupil’s work.

13. Community Links

·        Church Windows

·        Nature Walks

·         Photographs   of old buildings

·         Tree Week

·         Visiting local    artists

 

Success Criteria

·        What is the feedback from teachers based on the use of this plan in their preparation?

·         Do children get to experience all of the strands each year?

·         Is there progression for children from year to year across the 6 strands?

Implementation

(a) Roles and Responsibilities

The Visual Arts Co-ordinator is responsible for

•      Ensuring that this policy is reviewed and updated regularly

•      The sourcing of suitable resources

•      Conveying relevant information regarding exhibitions, competitions etc to staff

•      Organisation of gallery visits for different classes.

(c) Timeframe

This revised policy will be presented to all staff for discussion at a planning day in January 2018. The policy will then be presented to the Board of Management for ratification.

Review

This policy will be reviewed in the 2020/2021 academic year or sooner if deemed necessary.

Ratification and Communication

The ratified policy will be available

•      On the server

•      On the website

•      In reception

Parents will be informed about the policy in a school newsletter.

This policy was ratified on 9/04/2018

Appendix 3

Visual Arts Planning

  List of Artists to be studied  in different class levels

Junior Infants

Kandinsky

Senior Infants

Hunderwasser

First Class

Van Gogh

Second Class

Matisse

Piet Mondrian

Third Class

Picasso

 

Fourth class

Andy Warhol

Fifth Class

Claude Monet

Jack Yeats

Sixth Class

Salvador Dali

Johannes Vermeer

 

Appendix 5

Shared Resources in the School

Below is a list of Art Resources which are available in the Visual Arts Co-ordinator’s room.

 

 

  • 2 Paint-drying racks
  • Clay tools
  • 2 boxes of Fabric
  • Lots of Art prints for looking and responding (see below)

Appendix 1

 

Sample Activities for some Class Groups

 

Junior Infants Senior Infants First Class
Drawing Drawing Drawing
 

•      Make and describe different types of lines, i.e. wavy, pointy, spiky, wriggly, thick and thin lines. Find different types of lines in the classroom, school yard at home, etc.

•      Draw branches of trees. Draw a line that changes as you go across the page. PreReading and PreWriting activities. Maths Patterns.

•      Experiment with different types of drawing tools, e.g. pencils, crayons, chalk and paintbrushes.

•      Use lines to describe how things feel, e.g.

bumpy, smooth, etc.

 

 

•      Draw long/short, thick/thin and wavy, circular lines and lines that radiate from the centre, e.g. a daisy.

•      Draw lines on a range of surfaces, e.g. textured paper using dark crayons, soft pencils or chalk.

•      Use Paint Package on the computer to draw various types of lines. Compare with child’s work on a page.

•      Examine the lines in your hands and feet.

•      Draw pictures of the people in your family using curved and straight lines.

 

 

 

•      Recognise that lines have various properties, i.e. shape, texture and movement.

•      Draw lines on a variety of surfaces using pencils, crayons, chalk etc.

•      Explore and draw shapes and shadows.

•      Make silhouette drawings of simple objects.

•      Draw trees, leaves, flowers and fruit drawing attention to the edges.

•      Landscapes.

•      Still Life, e.g. Fruit Bowl, Potted plants, Bottles & Classroom objects.

Junior Infants Senior Infants First Class
Paint & Colour Paint & Colour Paint & Colour
 

• Observe primary colours (red, blue, yellow, etc.) Different shades and tints of these colours. Children could collect red, blue, yellow pictures for the colour table. Colour in shapes red, blue, etc.

 

•      Groups of colours – hot/cold colours. Hot –

Red, Orange, and Yellow. Cold – Green, Blue & White.

•      Experiment with matching colours – shade cards.

 

 

•      Mix primary colours to create colours.

•      Colour Wheel – arrange colours from light to dark. Refer to page 82 of the

Teacher’s Guidelines.

 

 

 

 

•      Move paint around in a variety of ways, blob painting, fold-over painting & blow painting.

•      Use different colours to reflect feelings – sad, happy.

•      Develop sensitivity to colour – light/dark, e.g. white chalk on black sugar paper, snowman, winter scene, one other colour with black

& white

 

 

•      Experience spatter painting with a toothbrush, string painting, dot painting with cotton buds, straw & sponge painting.

•      Use colour to interpret feelings & emotions.

•      Seasonal pictures, i.e. autumn scene, Halloween sky, Christmas snow scene, spring trees.

 

•      Experiment with colour using Paint package on the computer.

•      Paint objects that are in the classroom or paint a favourite toy.

•      Paint pictures based on the environment, e.g. a sunny or a stormy sky, a calm or a rough sea.

•      Seasonal scenes.

 

Junior Infants Senior Infants First Class
Print Print Print
 

•      Press a variety of objects onto paper to make a pattern, e.g. cubes, potatoes, cork, etc.

•      Leaf or bark rubbings.

•      Look at wrapping paper or wallpaper to describe different patterns.

•      Link patterns to maths, i.e. shape patterns.

 

 

•      Press a variety of objects onto paper to make patterns, as per Junior Infants, but children can use 2 or more colours to create the pattern.

•      Examine print design on posters, wallpapers and wrapping paper.

•      Children will have more experience of random patterns, e.g. 1 potato print, 2 leaf prints etc.

•      Make patterns with clay.

 

 

 

 

•      Children can do prints as in previous classes but they can progress to forming characters with prints, e.g. straw man, leaf lady, etc.

•      Random             and repeat patterns.

•      More    complex clay patterns.

•      T-shirt prints using paint.

•      Use a variety of surfaces (clay, tiles & material) for printing. Children can experiment with different surfaces (egg carton, kitchen rolls) for printing.

Junior Infants Senior Infants First Class
Clay Clay Clay
•         Roll,     squeeze,         pinch and pull play dough.

 

•         Make   letters         and

•         Roll,     squeeze,         pinch and pull play dough.

 

•         Make   letters         and

•      Use clay to make pinch pots & animals.

 

•      Make simple pottery –

 

numbers           using play dough.

•      Make simple animals, (sakes, snails) using play dough.

•      Introduce clay – make a clay ball and turn into a pinch pot.

•      Make animals e.g. a  hedgehog using clay and matchsticks for spikes.

 

numbers           using play dough.

•      Make simple animals, (sakes, snails) using play dough.

•      Use clay to make different shapes – 2D & 3D.

•      Use       mixed media

(lollipop, matchsticks, pipe cleaners) with the clay to create a variety of animals.

 

paint,    varnish and decorate.

•      Create solid structures (houses, buildings) using clay.

•      Experiment with and develop lines, shapes, textures and patterns in clay.

•      Decorate pottery with lines and patterns.

Junior Infants Senior Infants First Class
Construction Construction Construction
•      Use lego, straws, blocks, foam letters, beads & whiteboard to build.

•      Create simple characters,      e.g. witches,           Santa, reindeers,        using templates and glue.

•      Make masks from paper plates.

•      Construction via play, i.e. play with dolls house, tea-time, set up cups and saucers – Playroom

 

•      Use lego, straws, blocks, foam letters, beads & whiteboard to build as in Junior

Infants.

•      Create characters, e.g. witches, Santa, reindeers, using templates and glue. Allow children to cut out simple templates.

•      Make paper bag masks,

e.g. fox’s face.

•      Make simple puppets from paper bags.

•      Make simple constructions (houses, trains) from recyclable material.

 

•      Box of junk – children can make various items, e.g. tall buildings, monsters, castles, robots, etc. using a variety of material.

•      .Make puppets from old gloves or papier maiche.

•      Make happy, sad, angry masks and masks for special occasions.

•      Discuss the characteristics of visual structures, e.g. Eiffel Tower, Ennis Cathedral, Glor, (Refer to Teacher’s

Guidelines page 109.)

 

Junior Infants Senior Infants First Class
Fabric & Fibre Fabric & Fibre Fabric & Fibre
• Talk about clothes and they fabrics that are used to make them – discuss colours, patterns, texture, etc.

 

• Talk about clothes and they fabrics that are used to make them – discuss colours, patterns, texture, etc.

 

• Create seasonal collages using a variety of materials, e.g. spring or winter scene.

 

 

 

 

Create             popular seasonal             characters, e.g. snowmen, witches using felt and cotton wool.

Make pictures using wool, beads, ribbons, etc.

 

Children can describe what the texture feels like, e.g. soft, fluffy, rough, warm

Invent a costume for an imaginary figure or character.

Make collages using a variety of fabrics, e.g. material, beads and buttons.

 

Do        some    simple weaving            using cardboard and wool.

Design             and             make simple puppets.

Appendix 4

Assessment of pupil’s performance

Class Teacher:

Class:

 

Name of Pupil Objective 1 Objective 2 Objective 3 Comment

(Write comment here if pupil is not achieving objective)

         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         

 

Appendix 2

The Artist’s Chair

The Artist’s Chair can be used to aid looking and responding in the Visual Arts. It can be used for a child (also known as “the artist”) to talk about his/her picture/piece of construction, etc. The child can discuss why he/she chose certain materials/themes for his/her piece. It also gives the children in the class opportunities to discuss what they like about the piece of Art and gives an opportunity to speak directly to the artist and ask questions.

Alternatively the Artist’s Chair can be used after completing a study of a famous artists work. A child can pretend to be this Artist and the children can ask educated questions about his/her life and Artpieces. It can help to assess what the child has learned. It can also be used for children to guess the Artist after giving a few clues. Children are encouraged to use the formal language when appreciating a piece of Art and this develops as the child goes from class to class.

Appendix 2

The Artist’s Chair

The Artist’s Chair can be used to aid looking and responding in the Visual Arts. It can be used for a child (also known as “the artist”) to talk about his/her picture/piece of construction, etc. The child can discuss why he/she chose certain materials/themes for his/her piece. It also gives the children in the class opportunities to discuss what they like about the piece of Art and gives an opportunity to speak directly to the artist and ask questions.

Alternatively the Artist’s Chair can be used after completing a study of a famous artists work. A child can pretend to be this Artist and the children can ask educated questions about his/her life and Artpieces. It can help to assess what the child has learned. It can also be used for children to guess the Artist after giving a few clues. Children are encouraged to use the formal language when appreciating a piece of Art and this develops as the child goes from class to class.

Designed By